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HEP Grants - Stewardship, Habitat Restoration and Public Access Projects


Grants (2002 - 2013)


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Note: Click on any of the sections below to expand their items/details



1] Stewardship Grants back to top


2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002



2013 Citizen Science Grants back to top
  • Citizen Science Monitoring for Pathogen Indicators in NY-NJ Harbor Tributaries
    Citizen Science Monitoring for Pathogen Indicators in NY-NJ Harbor Tributaries Four groups of citizen scientists will be measuring water quality in their local waterbodies over the summer of 2014, with a focus on pathogen indicators. Citizen scientists are responsible for the full cycle of sample collection, analyses, and data management and publication, following strict quality assurance and quality control procedures approved by EPA. All the data will be displayed in an interactive online map developed by HEP.

    The Friends of the Bonsal Preserve are partnering with Montclair University to monitor the Third River, a tributary of the Passaic River; NY/NJ Baykeeper will be monitoring the South River and Matawan Creek, which drain to the Raritan Bay; the Sparkill Creek Watershed Alliance will be monitoring the Sparkill Creek in Rockland County; and the Bronx River Alliance is partnering with Rocking the Boat to monitor the Bronx River.

    This project is carried out in close collaboration with EPA, NJDEP, and NYSDEC with the goal of providing the tools that citizen scientists need to generate good quality, credible data for a variety of uses. EPA developed an umbrella quality assurance project plan for the project; trained citizen scientists in field, lab, and data management procedures; and lent the analytical equipment and supplies.



  • Man With Nature/Man Against Nature in Idlewild Park Preserve
    Man With Nature/Man Against Nature in Idlewild Park Preserve

    Eastern Queens Alliance will provide hands-on environmental education for youth, primarily from southeast Queens communities in a series of summer and after-school Science-in-the-Park Workshops. The goal is to help youth understand the need to preserve the Idlewild Park Preserve wetland systems and the larger Jamaica Bay Watershed of which they are part, and to show how these systems fit within the New York/New Jersey Harbor Estuary. The workshops will use Idlewild Park Preserve as a learning laboratory and will also include classroom type activities. Clean-up, planting, and trail maintenance will be included in the project.

  • Estuarine Stewardship Program for 5th Graders in Monmouth County, NJ
    Estuarine Stewardship Program for 5th Graders in Monmouth County, NJ

    Friends of Monmouth Park System will offer a series of free field trips during the 2013-2014 school year for 5th grade students from eight small urban-suburban school districts in the Harbor Estuary Program core area of Monmouth County that were significantly flooded by Super-storm Sandy. Activities will take place outdoors at the Bayshore Waterfront Park, a county park system-owned facility located along Sandy Hook Bay. Activities will include seining, plankton collection, water quality testing, and stewardship practices to improve habitat. Members of the local, all-volunteer Bayshore Watershed Council will be on hand to help provide real-world experiences and stewardship advice by local anglers, policy makers, and scientists.

  • Building Stewardship at the "Daylighted" Water's Edge
    Building Stewardship at the "Daylighted" Water's Edge

    Groundwork Hudson Valley will offer a series of activities throughout the summer at Van der Donk park in Yonkers, NY, where the Saw Mill River was recently “daylighted”. The main objectives or this project are to:

    • Increase engagement with, and stewardship of, the Saw Mill River and the Hudson River estuary among Yonkers residents through hands-on, water’s edge art and science activities that will take advantage of the unique teaching laboratory offered by the river’s tidal dynamics.
    • Showcase the new daylighted park as an environmental engineering model in the estuary region.
    • Highlight the connections among the river, the estuary, and the Sargasso Sea through a public information campaign, including creating a signature “mascot”—the American eel.


  • Paths to Pier 42
    Paths to Pier 42
    Pier 42 garden

    Hester Street Collaborative, with other Lower East Side Waterfront Alliance members, carried out Paths to Pier 42 in the summer of 2013. This effort created community accesss to a neglected section of the East River Waterfront while addressing issues of waterfront and neighborhood resiliency raised by Hurricane Sandy, and demonstrating activities that can take place once the projected park is fully developed. Paths to Pier 42 offered a series of art, cultural and educational programming.

    HEP funding enabled two project partners, the Lower East Side Ecology Center and Two Bridges Neighborhood Council, to provide programming directly and indirectly related to the estuary. This included activities such as catch and release fishing, water quality testing workshops, bird watching walking tours and guidebooks, and deployment of a touch tank with creatures found in the estuary.

    Read the final report | Click Here (pdf)



  • NJ’s Lower Hudson River Waterfront - 25 Years of Construction. Challenges for the Next 25 Post Sandy Era
    NJ’s Lower Hudson River Waterfront - 25 Years of Construction. Challenges for the Next 25 Post Sandy Era

    Hudson River Waterfront Conservancy of New Jersey organized a one-day conference on October 8, 2013 to seek ways and means to achieve resilience along the Hudson River shoreline in New Jersey while simultaneously securing the free public access pathway at the river’s edge known as the Hudson River Waterfront Walkway. The conference focused on the waterfront’s physical, insurance, financial and legal problems. The event was held at Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, NJ. The event brought together nonprofit groups, property owners along the waterfront, and the general public, to learn about waterfront sustainability and the legal requirements to repair and maintain free, unobstructed access to the Walkway. An in-depth report on the conference was created and distributed free of charge to libraries, local governments and nonprofit groups and is available on the Conservancy website along with presentation slides.

    Read the final report, including summaries of the presentations | Click Here (pdf)

  • Waterfront Connections: North Brooklyn Estuary Stewardship Program
    Waterfront Connections: North Brooklyn Estuary Stewardship Program
    Human Impacts Institute (HII) will provide the public with action oriented stewardship activities that involve community members in our estuary. HII will conduct a series of free and open to the public workshops that immerse participants in Brooklyn’s natural waterfront environment and introduce them to the waterways surrounding North Brooklyn. Hands-on activities will result in a fully functional oyster garden, a shoreline native species garden at East River State Park, and installation of “No Dumping, Leads to Waterways” storm drain stencil plaques throughout North Brooklyn. These project areas are interrelated means to encourage community members of all ages and lifestyles involved in creative, estuary stewardship. The project proposed will complement and strengthen the current North Brooklyn Estuary Education and Exploration program, funded by HEP in 2012.

  • Newark Goes Back to the River Boat Tours & Walkshops
    Newark Goes Back to the River Boat Tours & Walkshops
    Ironbound Community Corporation and City of Newark will offer a series of boat and walking tours of the Passaic River and its environs. Project goals are to increase public education and community involvement on river ecology and restoration, improve public access to the Passaic River, enhance stewardship of the Passaic River and its upland areas, and build and strengthen the constituency for the sustainable and inclusive development of Newark’s riverfront. Tours will be narrated by the City of Newark’s Waterfront Planner and staff of Hackensack Riverkeeper.

    Read the final report | Click Here (pdf)

  • Plank Road Cleanup and Access
    Plank Road Cleanup and Access
    Newtown Creek Alliance and North Brooklyn Boat Club will improve the Plank Road street end (58th Road in Maspeth, Queens), an underutilized street end with known historic and ecological significance on Newtown Creek. By offering cleanup and mulching days, the project seeks to hedge against future misuse of the site, improve management of stormwater that inundates the site, and support the existing habitat. The project partners will also conduct guided trips to the site by foot and by boat to educate future stewards of Newtown Creek about its unique history and persistent ecosystem.

    Read the final report | Click Here (pdf)

  • Bronx River American Eel Monitoring
    Bronx River American Eel Monitoring
    Rocking the Boat  partnered with scientists from the Wildlife Conservation Society and Bronx River Alliance to monitor the presence and behavior of American eel, a declining species that was once abundant in the Bronx River. Collecting baseline information on this keystone species is a valuable first step in understanding the impact of past restoration efforts in the Bronx River and the need for future ones. This will enable scientists to develop appropriate and realistic restoration and management goals. Over 250 local youth participants from Rocking the Boat’s suite of daytime and after-school On-Water programming participated in the project, collecting 34 sets of monitoring data that were conveyed to the WCS for analysis and inclusion in the organization’s public database.

    Read the final report | Click Here (pdf)


2012 Stewardship Grants back to top
  • North Brooklyn Estuary Exploration Program
    North Brooklyn Estuary Exploration Program
    Clean Water workshop at East River State Park

    The Human Impacts Institute (HII) engaged members of the North Brooklyn community in free environmental education workshops at the East River State Park. These workshops educated participants through hands-on activities and focused on water issues that affect the community, highlighting cultural diversity as well as connections with, and impacts on, the estuary. In addition, the HII developed an estuary-themed educational tour of the park through multi-lingual signage establishing existing features of the park as learning resources.

    Read the final report | Click Here (pdf)

    View copies of the signs (in English and Spanish) | Click Here (pdf)

    Read article about clean water workshop.

  • Raritan Bay & Sandy Hook Bay Stewardship Program for 5th Graders
    Raritan Bay & Sandy Hook Bay Stewardship Program for 5th Graders

    The Monmouth County Park System (MCPS) carried out free field day trips for 5th grade teachers and their students to the Bayshore Waterfront Park. Students learned about the estuary through hands-on activities such as seining, plankton identification, and scientific experiments related to non-point source pollution. Teachers also participated in a free educator workshop program to learn how to employ the local estuarine environment in classroom curriculum regarding science and social studies. The MCPS and the Bayshore Regional Watershed Council partnered to provide a series of additional stewardship activities, including beach cleanups and horseshoe crab observation.

    Read the complete report (including pictures) | Click Here (pdf)


  • Marine Biology Intern Scholarships
    Marine Biology Intern ScholarshipsInterns cleaning tanks

    The River Project offered a scholarship for low-income students to participate in the summer 2013 Marine Biology Internship Program. The scholarship covered lunch and transportation costs, helping overcome some of the barriers to participation. HEP funds also allowed expanding the internship program and providing more hours of training from staffers and experts. The internship offers unique hands-on job and career-building experience while promoting environmental stewardship. Interns will learn multiple skills, including water quality testing, organism identification and husbandry, laboratory skills, and urban field techniques.

    Read the final report | Click Here (pdf)



  • Gowanus Canal Urban Ecology Lecture Series
    Gowanus Canal Urban Ecology Lecture SeriesGabriel Willow leading a bat walk at twilight

    The Gowanus Canal Conservancy (GCC) increased the reach of their Urban Ecology Lecture Series and included more estuary-related topics, promoting a better understanding by local residents of the environmental issues affecting the Gowanus Canal and the whole estuary, as well as efforts and opportunities to improve conditions. The GCC offered ten lectures reaching over 300 people, and covered a variety of topics, including habitat restoration efforts, walking tours featuring wildlife in the Canal, and contaminated sites, among others. HEP funds allowed increasing efforts to publicize the lectures, bring additional speakers and emphasize estuary-related themes.

    Read the final report | Click Here (pdf)


  • Days of Fun on Our Raritan River
    Days of Fun on Our Raritan RiverRiver Art I!, Sadowsky Park, Perth Amboy, 2013

    The Middlesex County Improvement Authority (MCIA) and several project partners led a variety of fun and educational, recreational, historical, and environmental activities and presentations at several Lower Raritan River public access sites in the nine riverfront communities on the Lower Raritan River. Topics included the estuary, public access, recreational and stewardship opportunities, stream wildlife and health, and historical and personal connections to the Raritan River. Materials were collected from others and new ones specific to the Lower Raritan were developed and distributed. Opportunities for new and different collaborations were explored. Press coverage and education was promoted.

    Read the final report | Click Here (pdf)



  • Promoting Access and Stewardship on the Rahway River
    Promoting Access and Stewardship on the Rahway River

    The Association of New Jersey Environmental Commissions (ANJEC) worked with, and helped, the ten environmental commissions and other local officials in the 24 municipalities along the Rahway River watershed to promote River stewardship and access. The project stressed stormwater education and management, a topic that has garnered much attention in these communities after recent damaging floods. ANJEC educated public officials and provided guidance on stormwater management options, and created a pool of educational materials that municipalities can use to educate local residents and promote public access to, and stewardship of, the river.

    Read the complete report | Click Here (pdf)

  • Gone Fishing: Marine Education Programs for Title I Schools Aboard the Historic Schooner Pioneer
    Gone Fishing: Marine Education Programs for Title I Schools Aboard the Historic Schooner Pioneer
  • HEP funds allowed the South Street Seaport Museum to providing this on-water, field-based science program for free to youth from three New York City Title I schools (those certified by the City’s Department of Education to have a high percentage of students living in poverty). Students sailed in the NY-NJ Harbor and learned about the natural live of the estuary and humans’ impact upon it. Students also learned to set sails, sample marine animals, and conduct water quality tests, among other activities.

    Read the final report | Click Here (pdf)


  • Horticulture Operations Center: Stormwater Retrofit

    The New York Botanical Garden reconstructed the Horticulture Operations Center, reducing impermeable paved surfaces to increase on-site infiltration, and eliminating existing stormwater outflows to the Bronx River. Work Completed includes the removal of over 21,000 square feet of buildings and 30,000 SF of impermeable pavement, and installment of the following green infrastructure features:

    • over 20,000 SF permeable gravel pavement
    • over 8,000 SF of permeable asphalt with storm detention gravel bed
    • over 600 linear feet of storm capture infiltration trenches/tree pits
    • stormwater filtering technology
    • a re-circulating waste water treatment system
    • over 2000 SF of permeable woody plant nursery
    • over 120 linear feet of trench drain
    • over 375 cubic yards of permeable planting beds Read the final report

    Read the final report | Click Here (pdf)

     



2011 Stewardship Grants back to top

HEP, in partnership with NEIWPCC, is funding four stewardship projects this year. As projects are completed, final reports will be posted.

  • Wading and Shore Birds Study
    Wading and Shore Birds Study

    Rocking the Boat, in collaboration with the New York City Audubon Society, conducted and promoted regular surveys on the foraging and behavior habits of the wading and shore bird populations along the Bronx River. The project goals were to teach science methods to high school age youth; raise awareness of these spectacular birds’ presence in, and importance to, the Bronx River estuary; and inform future conservation efforts by generating much needed data. High school students enrolled in the organization’s Job Skills and On- Water Classroom Programs received training, regularly observed and recorded wading bird activity at six sites on the Bronx River, and delivered data to New York City Audubon.

    Read the full report | Click Here (pdf)
    (including the field guide created by students to help birdwatchers identify the various species surveyed)



  • Aqua 101: Rockaway Youth Stewardship Program
    Aqua 101: Rockaway Youth Stewardship Program

    Rockaway Waterfront Alliance (RWA) offered this year-round intensive, service learning, environmental stewardship program from July 2011 to June 2012, for 50 local Rockaway youth, ages 12 - 18, along the Beach to Bay corridor of Beach 59th St. in the Rockaway Peninsula in Queens, NY. Students utilized the waterfront along the bay and ocean shoreline as well as the 59th St. corridor, as an outdoor environmental classroom to take part in marine debris removal, habitat restoration, tree stewardship, and rain water collection. As they learned about the estuarine habitat of Jamaica Bay and the Rockaway shoreline, students identified environmental hazards that exist around the Beach 59th street corridor and developed and implemented strategies to reduce environmental hazards.

    Read the full report | Click Here (pdf)



  • Stewardship of the Lower Raritan River
    Stewardship of the Lower Raritan River
    The Association of NJ Environmental Commissions (ANJEC) promoted stewardship of the lower Raritan River by helping municipal environmental commissions to develop signage at river access points and local outreach programs to encourage use of the river and abutting trails and parks.

    Read the full report | Click Here (pdf)



  • NY/NJ Harbor Estuary Signature Program for Seniors
    NY/NJ Harbor Estuary Signature Program for Seniors

    New Jersey Audubon engaged senior citizens in learning about the Raritan Watershed and estuary through a series of programs at community centers and assisted living facilities. Programs and field trips focused on regional natural history, resource conservation, stewardship initiatives and environmental issues. The project was completed under budget and the remaining funds were used to carry out cleanups and stewardship activities at the Hawk Rise Sanctuary in Linden, NJ.

    Read the full report (including pictures) | Click Here (pdf)


2010 Stewardship Grants back to top

HEP, in partnership with NEIWPCC, is funding three stewardship projects this year. As projects are completed, final reports will be posted.

  • NY-NJ Harbor Estuary EarthCache Discovery Trail
    Estuary EcoCaching Discovery Trail
    Going Coastal has developed two virtual interpretive routes at Liberty State Park, NJ and Inwood Hill Park, NY. EarthCaching is a concept similar to Geocaching (a treasure hunt using Global Positioning System or GPS). The EarthCaching Discovery Trails explain various characteristics of the Estuary’s ecology, geography, geology and the impact of human activity upon the environment, and include field experiences and hands-on interactive tasks. Visitors can borrow a handheld GPS unit at the park or use their own mobile devices with GPS applications to explore the trails. Participants can share their experiences through the international EarthCaching portal. To learn more, visit Going Coastal's web page.

    Read the full report | Click Here (pdf)


  • EnvironMentors for the Elizabeth River / Arthur Kill Watershed
    EnvironMentors for the Elizabeth River / Arthur Kill Watershed
    Kean University will bring university faculty and students together with groups of local high school students to collaborate on studying place-based issues of importance to the future stakeholders of the Estuary. This project is part of the National Council for Science and the Environment (NCSE)’s EnvironMentors Program. The topics to be explored will include: floatables and storm drains, land use and water quality, habitat restoration and invasive species, oyster gardening, and meteorological influences on the estuarine flow.

    24 high school students will pair with 24 undergrad students at Kean with guidance from a graduate student. Faculty will deliver instruction and conduct overall supervision. Mentors and mentees will participate in workshops to learn about the scientific method, experimental design, science writing, and other topics. Each team will plan and execute a research project (including field activities) and present results to their peers.

  • Youth Stewardship Program
    Youth Stewardship Program
    The Rockaway Youth Stewardship Program offered by the Rockaway Waterfront Alliance (RWA) was an intensive, service learning, environmental stewardship program offered as a summer youth and after school program from July 6th,2010 to June 30th,2011, 2 days a week with 25 local youth, ages 12 - 18, along the Beach to Bay corridor of Beach 59th Street in the Rockaway Peninsula. Students utilized the waterfront along the bay and ocean shoreline as an outdoor environmental classroom to take part in marine debris removal, habitat restoration, and marine science. As they learned about the estuarine habitat of Jamaica Bay and the Rockaway shoreline, students identified environmental hazards that exist around the Beach 59th street corridor and developed strategies to reduce environmental hazards.

    Read the complete report, including pictures | Click Here (pdf)

    Rockaway Waterfront Alliance also compiled a toolkit with lesson plans (pdf)and other useful resources to help other groups that might carry out similar programs. 


2009 Stewardship Grants back to top

  • Reducing Stormwater Runoff through Green Infrastructure in a High Density Residential Development in New York City
    Reducing Stormwater Runoff through Green Infrastructure ...
    The New York City Soil and Water Conservation District (NYCSWCD) reduced stormwater runoff in a residential building by installing a stormwater Low Impact Development (LID) practice and incorporating vegetation in an already developed area. The project was installed in a low-income housing complex owned by a not-for-profit organization on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. NYCSWCD painted a mural incorporating elements of pollution, nature and water purification, and developed a simple curriculum for the preschool that occupies part of the residence, educating and engaging teachers, parents and students.

    Read the complete report (including pictures) | Click Here (pdf)

  • Litter Marshall Program – Clean Streets = Clean Water!
    Litter Marshall Program – Clean Streets = Clean Water!
    Hackensack Riverkeeper, in collaboration with the Bergen County Sheriff’s Office carried out an anti-littering campaign educating local residents about the many negative impacts of littering and encouraging them to be part of the solution. The campaign included a series of billboards, as well as brochures that were widely distributed in areas frequented by motorists. These materials encouraged people to report littering incidents to the Bergen County Litter Marshal Hotline (1-877-CPT- BILL). The Sheriff’s Office sent a letter to litterers that included educational materials and a warning that that littering is a crime subject to fines.

    Read the complete report (including pictures) | Click Here (pdf)


2008 Stewardship Grants back to top

  • Increasing Public Access and Accessibility to the Brooklyn Waterfront
    Increasing Public Access and Accessibility to the Brooklyn Waterfront
    Sebago Canoe Club, an all-volunteer nonprofit group, built a new ramp and dock to improve access to Paerdegat Basin in Jamaica Bay, replacing a 40-year old structure that was in poor shape and thus limited the types of activities this group was able to carry out and the number of participants they were able to engage. The new ramp allowed accommodating more and different types of boats, and enabled Sebago Canoe Club to offer their paddling programs to a wider audience (approximately 600 people), including the general public and youth. The wider and less steep ramp also allows safer wheelchair access and the Club carried out their first event to disabled paddlers, who were especially grateful for the opportunity to access the water.

    Read the complete report (including pictures) | Click Here(pdf)

  • Preservation of Shoreline Areas by High School Students
    Preservation of Shoreline Areas by High School Students
    The Council on the Environment of New York City (CENYC) delivered 7 weekly lessons on the estuary and stormwater issues to over 800 students from 8 high schools in three NYC boroughs. After learning in the classroom, the students planted native trees, shrubs and other plants, removed invasive species, and conducted other shoreline preservation activities at 12 nearby parks and other locations. CENYC partnered with several organizations that selected the sites and supervised the field work, including the Bronx River Alliance, the Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR) Natural Resources Group, Friends of Riverside Park, and Morningside Park Gardening Office at DPR

    Read the complete report (including pictures) | Click Here (pdf)

  • NY-NJ Harbor Education Program
    NY-NJ Harbor Education Program
    The Brooklyn Center for the Urban Environment (CUE) and the NJ Marine Sciences Consortium (NJMSC) are two not for profit educational groups that built on previously developed materials (also funded by HEP) and created and delivered new materials for students in grades 4 to 8, including hands-on activities. They taught one classroom session and then took the students to the Estuary for a field session and a tour of the Harbor. This program reached 275 students from 12 classes, for most of which this was their first time on the water and their teachers, from underserved public schools in NJ and Brooklyn, NY. They also held a professional development session for 58 teachers so they can use the materials in their classrooms.

    Read the complete report (including pictures) | Click Here(pdf)

  • NY Oyster Program
    NY Oyster Program
    NY-NJ Baykeeper expanded their oyster program and continued to work to bring about the restoration of oyster reefs in the Harbor Estuary while raising awareness among the population about this important species. All educational materials produced are available from their website www.urbanoysters.org. The group and partners—the Gowanus Dredgers Canoe Club, New York Harbor School, and the River Project—expanded and delivered hands-on activities at several oyster gardens, including experiments on growing oysters from larvae in NYC and building oyster cages. This program involved approximately 125 K-12 and high school students, some of which had the opportunity to study oysters in collaboration with scientists at The River Project, and using equipment at Brookhaven National Lab. Baykeeper also organized a lecture series on oyster issues that attracted 175 participants and included four lectures and an educators’ workshop. In addition, they carried out an Urban Oyster Restoration Conference in Governors Island, with over 130 participants, where students presented the results from their research.

    Read the complete report (including pictures) | Click Here(pdf)



2007 Stewardship Grants back to top

  • Friends of the Estuary Partners
    Friends of the Estuary Partners
    The Friends of the Estuary (FOTE) Partners are the Association of New Jersey Environmental Commissions, the Council on the Environment of New York City, Future City Inc., and the New York Academy of Sciences. FOTE partners collaborated on a program to motivate community members in the NY/NJ region to properly dispose of used motor oil. They created and distributed a series of brochures and educational materials and taught community members about the environmental impacts of improperly disposed motor oil and the importance of properly managing this fluid. The FOTE projects targeted owners, operators, managers, employees, and customers of relevant small businesses, retail stores, and recycling or transporting companies of used motor oil, as well as networks of citizens including high school and college students, citizen volunteers and municipal environmental commissions. In particular, retail stores were deemed to be the best way to reach the driving public, especially “do-it-yourselfers” (DIY's) who change their own motor oil and often are not aware of proper management and disposal options.

    Read the complete report (including brochures) | Click Here (pdf)

  • NY-NJ Harbor Education Program
    The Brooklyn Center for the Urban Environment (CUE) and the New Jersey Marine Sciences Consortium (NJMSC) produced and shared a NY-NJ Harbor curriculum for New York and New Jersey’s middle school students with the goal of promoting widespread understanding of the complexities of the area and promote “sustainable” behavior as it pertains to our urban estuary. The curriculum consists of teaching materials, an in-school presentation and guided outdoor experiences and was designed to promote understanding and appreciation of the vitality and value of the Harbor Estuary Complex from both the ecological and human perspective. The curriculum was implemented in May 2007 with several pilot schools from Brooklyn and New Jersey, laying the foundation for long-term program replication, curriculum dissemination, and creative NY-NJ environmental education partnerships.

    Read the complete report (including pictures) | Click Here (pdf)

  • Increasing Harbor Stewardship through Oyster Restoration in New York City Partners
    Increasing Harbor Stewardship through Oyster Restoration in New York City Partners
    Partners in this project (The River Project, NY/NJ Baykeeper, and the New York Harbor School) worked to increase stewardship among residents of the NY–NJ Harbor Estuary through training oyster gardeners from schools and community organizations in New York City and conducting outreach about their work. Collaborators trained the oyster gardeners to help prepare an oyster reef off the Tribeca waterfront and conducted outreach about their work to the general public, government agencies, and elected officials. The primary audience—oyster gardeners—gained new knowledge and skills to function as Harbor stewards and promote restoration and favorable attitudes among New York City residents about improving the ecological health of the harbor. The secondary audience—the general public, government agencies, and elected officials—learned about oyster gardening directly from the main project partners, and indirectly from media attention attracted by new oyster gardening groups.

    Read the complete report (including pictures) | Click Here (pdf)

 

2005 Stewardship Grants back to top

  • Many Mind Creek Stewardship: Interactive Learning in the NY-NJ Harbor Estuary Ecosystem
    This Atlantic Highlands Environmental Commission project focused on Many Mind Creek saltmarsh and fringe habitat - HEP Priority Acquisition Site RB17. The long-term overall goal of the project was to improve the NY-NJ Harbor Estuary ecosystem by motivating young people and adults to become informed stewards of Many Mind Creek's watershed and to actively work towards acquiring waterfront acres for habitat restoration purposes. The approach to meet this goal was to a) involve high school students in the design of an interpretive panel for an information box to be installed on Earth Day 2006 at the origin of Many Mind Creek, 2 miles before it flows into Sandy Hook Bay; b) recruit adults to actively work towards the acquisition of waterfront areas for habitat restoration; c) increase awareness of elected officials by inviting them to participate in estuary stewardship activities; and d) sponsor events for families to appreciate the estuary while participating in waterfront leisure activities (e.g., eco-kayak tours, birding, seining, beach cleanup, estuary walk/talks).

    Read the complete report | Click Here (pdf)

  • Matawan Creek & Pews Creek Educational Outreach Program in Raritan Bay Subwatershed
    Matawan Creek & Pews Creek Educational Outreach Program in Raritan Bay Subwatershed
    The Bayshore Regional Watershed Council (BRWC) partnered with the Borough of Matawan Environmental Commission and with the Friends of Pews Creed Volunteer Group to label approximately 400 storm drain inlets that empty into Raritan Bay with a marker that reads "No Dumping - Drains to Bay." These partners, along with local scout and school groups, labeled drains along Matawan Creek/Lefferts Lake and Pews Creek, waterways that are bounded by heavy residential and commercial development. BRWC distributed informational door hangers to local property owners to emphasize that stormwater is not treated before entering the bay, and to inform residents on how to mitigate nonpoint source pollution. The goal was to educate people about local water quality so that they can change their attitudes and behaviors to help solve the problem. To further educate local residents, BRWC also held a stream clean up and a free public nature walk for Matawan Creek and Pews Creek.

    Read the complete report | Click Here (pdf)

  • Southern Brooklyn Ecological Education Partnership
    Southern Brooklyn Ecological Education Partnership
    The Southern Brooklyn Ecological Education Partnership continued educational studies with already established partners, the New York Aquarium and Lafayette High School. This partnership has evolved as an active part of the City of New York Parks & Recreation (Parks) Natural Areas Stewardship Program, which trains community members to become "Citizen Stewards" of their local parks and natural resources by engaging them in field studies, community outreach, native habitat restoration, and species conservation. By conducting this work at parks bordering Coney Island Creek (a HEP High Priority Restoration Site) students and teenage volunteers in the Aquarium Docent program also were able to see the process the Parks' Natural Resources Group (NRG) takes to measure restoration success. A coordinator organized outdoor field studies designed to help the students discover the biodiversity of plants, fish, and animals in their local environment. Participants learned how these populations are affected by the surrounding environment, becoming more aware of the natural world around them, learning hands-on field science skills and growing as stewards of the urban natural environment.

    Read the complete report | Click Here (pdf)

  • Training Student Organizers to Preserve Local Waters & Lands
    The Council on the Environment of New York City (CENYC) conducted its Training Student Organizers (TSO) program to motivate 400 high school students from 6 schools to participate in projects to restore shoreline areas of 7 New York City Parks in the Harbor Estuary region. The participating teens were instructed by CENYC staff on a weekly basis about the issues of water, watersheds and the various ways citizens can preserve water quality. Students learned the importance of water quality parameters such as dissolved oxygen, pH, and phosphates. The students also helped stop erosion and runoff from Park shorelines by removing approximately 22,000 square feet of invasive species and planting 875 trees. This project gave students the opportunity to improve quality of life and gain knowledge and experiences, encouraging them to be stewards of the environment throughout their lives.

    Read the complete report | Click Here (pdf)

  • Passaic River Patrol
    Hackensack Riverkeeper ran a series of Passaic River Patrol Eco-Cruises along the lower Passaic. The Eco-cruises, created last year in partnership with NY/NJ Baykeeper and the Rutgers Environmental Law Clinic, bring public officials, the press, school children and the public in general out onto the lower Passaic River. Getting people out to see natural resources up close and personal is a critical strategy in working to protect, preserve and restore the Harbor Estuary. During the Eco-cruises, passengers learn about floatable debris and nonpoint source pollution; wildlife; recreation on the river, public access and the Public Trust Doctrine; industrial pollution and toxic contaminants; and NJDEP advisories prohibiting consumption of fish and crabs. On-board resources include laminated charts, wildlife identification cards and maps showing current and potential public access points. Participants also receive a river fact sheet and a list of suggestions for future actions they can take to help restore the river.

    Read the complete report | Click Here (pdf)

  • Natco Park Annual Cleanup and Education Program
    The Hazlet Township Environmental Commission, a group of community-minded environmental volunteers, coordinates stewardship of the Natco Park Conservation Area. On September 17, 2005, the Environmental Commission featured its annual cleanup of Natco Park, involving many local community members, including children and families. The cleanup was followed by an educational program that included tours of the park and the lake shore with education on the relationship between the brackish lake and the local estuarine ecosystem. The program included the identification of marine and plant life, the location of tidelines on the lake shore, and the history of Natco Lake, including how it was created and how it links to Raritan Bay. Educational materials about protecting the Park were also distributed.

  • Teacher Training Workshop for the Urban Estuary
    Hudson River Sloop Clearwater implemented a three-day Teacher Training Workshop for the Urban Estuary for New York City teachers in summer 2005. The workshop, conducted in partnership with New York University's Wallerstein Collaborative, provided 30 NYC teachers with tools, knowledge, and experience to enhance delivery of science-based environmental education about the Hudson River and New York Harbor. On day one teachers reviewed background "estuary essentials" and model activities that they can replicate to introduce key concepts in the classroom. The second day brought participants aboard the Clearwater for a 5-hour sail to learn what students in our programs learn - river science, water quality, navigation, fishing, and waterfront history. On the final day participants returned to the classroom to adapt concepts to critical thinking activities for their environmental education curricula. The teacher training workshop used materials, curricula and techniques developed and refined in previous projects.

    Read the complete report | Click Here (pdf)

  • Youth-Based Environmental Education & Community Service
    The International Youth Organization (IYO) conducted a Youth-Based Environmental Education & Community Service project in the Passaic and Hackensack River Watersheds. IYO administers the Newark branch of the NJ Youth Corps, which combines community service with GED preparatory classes for young people between the ages of 16 and 25. In Fall 2005, Corpsmembers on IYO's Environmental Projects Team conducted outreach and restoration in the highly urbanized and polluted watersheds of these two rivers. The goal of this project was to teach the Environmental Team about local waters and watersheds; involve them in remediation projects such a litter clean-ups, invasive vegetation removal, and landscape plantings; and develop their skills as leaders and educators to local schoolchildren. IYO partnered with area environmental nonprofits to invest in the training of the Corpsmembers and with Newark Public Schools to transfer this knowledge to local youth.

  • Public Right-of-Way Inventory
    The Middletown Township Environmental Commission documented the township's public right-of-ways (ROWs) and created a new data layer of these public lands in its GIS system. Middletown is a municipality bordered by the Raritan Bay to the north and the Swimming River/Navesink River system to the south and east. Along these bodies of water are many ROWs that exist as paper tax streets extending to the bordering waterbody. Although the ROWs provide both open space and public access to the water, they are not currently mapped or included in the Township's Open Space Plan. Waterfront land owners often submit applications to the Township to abandon these ROWs and have them revert to private ownership. The ROW map produced by the Environmental Commission will help guide the Township's Planning Department when it reviews ROW abandonment applications. The map will also be used by the Township Open Space Committee as it identifies areas to be included in the land preservation program. Once documented and preserved the ROWs can be established as formal access points to the waterbodies.

    Read the complete report | Click Here (pdf)

  • NY/NJ Harbor: Hidden Treasures in Your Own Backyard
    NY/NJ Harbor: Hidden Treasures in Your Own Backyard
    The New Jersey Marine Sciences Consortium (NJMSC) produced 5000 copies of an educational activity booklet about the NY-NJ Harbor Estuary for the region's schoolchildren in grades 3-6. Entitled "NY-NJ Harbor: Hidden Treasures in Your Own Backyard," the booklet introduces students to the Harbor Estuary Complex, its natural and commercial resources, and the critical contribution it makes to life in the region. Topics include geography, navigation, Port commerce, job and career opportunities, ecosystems dynamics (including food webs and habitats), water quality, oceanographic processes (tides, currents) and plants and animals. The booklet contains puzzles, word games, fact cards, and simple harbor-related science activities that students can do at home or in school. Also included is a harbor-based internet activity that uses real-time data from the New York Harbor Observing and Prediction System NYHOPS) website of the Stevens Institute of Technology's Davidson Laboratory. This project will contribute towards building a comprehensive curriculum for NJMSC's All Hands On Deck harbor education program.

    Read the complete report | Click Here (pdf)

    View the Hidden Treasures booklet | Click Here (pdf)

  • Harlem River Festival at Swindler Cove Park
    Each year, New York Restoration Project (NYRP) hosts a Harlem River Festival on National Estuaries Day at Swindler Cove Park, a new park NYRP helped create on the banks of the Harlem River in northern Manhattan on the site of what was once an illegal dumping ground. This year's festival, held on September 24, 2005, included a number of hands-on activities and demonstrations - seining for aquatic wildlife, water quality testing, dip-netting, and oyster gardening - that informed participants about the NY-NJ Harbor Estuary at the Harlem River, current efforts to restore water quality and wildlife habitat in the area, as well as its rich but largely forgotten natural and social history. A field walk entitled "Marvelous Mud Flats" introduced participants to the river's littoral zone, which is home to invertebrates that feed migrating birds and other animals. During the walk, festival attendees did their part to keep the estuary clean by participating in a shoreline clean-up. Activities for children included storytelling about the history of the estuary and fish-themed papermaking using recycled paper.

    Read the complete report | Click Here (pdf)

  • Lower East Side Ecology Center Estuary Stewardship Program
    Lower East Side Ecology Center Estuary Stewardship Program
    The Lower East Side Ecology Center Estuary Stewardship Program offered family-oriented events related to estuarine education, the urban water cycle and local habitats. The program promoted stewardship and encouraged local youth and their families to explore the NY-NJ Harbor Estuary along East River Park on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. This series of weekend and summer events included hands-on activities such as catch-and-release fishing, beach clean-ups, and water quality testing. During these events visitors were able to explore the resources available at the Center, such as dynamic river tanks and microscopes for examining aquatic organisms. The Estuary Stewardship Program expanded the Center's educational programming by moving beyond school-year classroom activities to reach a broader audience of local community members and park users.

    Read the complete report (including pictures) | Click Here (pdf)

  • Urban Waters Environmental Education Program
    The Urban Waters Environmental Education Program employed the South Street Seaport Museum's schooner Lettie G. Howard, a sail training and marine education vessel, to develop and enhance young New Yorkers' sense of marine environmental stewardship. The Museum conducted three overnight sail training and marine education programs for at-risk teens from New York City social service organizations with whom they have partnered in the past. The project helped urban teens establish a connection with and a commitment to preserving the waters of New York Harbor and the Hudson-Raritan Estuary. The three overnight programs served a total of 39 youth, who explored New York City's waterways, participated in hands-on marine and environmental science activities and experiments (e. g., trawling for marine life and testing water quality), and reflected on and discussed the essential role that citizens can play in preserving and protecting the estuary.

    Read the complete report | Click Here (pdf)

 

2004 Stewardship Grants back to top

  • Storm Drain Labeling and Public Education Program in Raritan Bay
    The Bayshore Regional Watershed Council, an all volunteer group located in the Raritan Bay watershed region, partnered with environmental commissions in Aberdeen and Atlantic Highlands to label approximately 400 stormdrains for two creeks: Gravelly Brook and Many Mind Creek. The educational stormdrain markers provided the important environmental message: “NO DUMPING – DRAINS TO CREEK.” In addition, door hangers with information on how to reduce nonpoint pollution were distributed to residents living near the waterways. This project helped to increase public awareness of the connection between local waterways, which people notice virtually every day, and the health of the Harbor Estuary.

    Read the complete report | Click Here (pdf)

  • Newark Watershed Professional Development Program for Educators
    Greater Newark Conservancy's new professional development workshop, "Exploring Newark's Watershed," taught about the water cycle, water conservation and the Newark Bay Watershed. This two-day workshop began at the Conservancy's new Prudential Outdoor Learning Center, where teachers explored how to use the Urban Wildlife gallery's water features and newly developed curriculum to teach their students about the estuary. On the second day, workshop participants learned how to take water samples and identify local wildlife aboard an ecocruise with the Hackensack Riverkeeper. The Newark Watershed workshop, designed for teachers of grades 5 and above, will become a regular offering in the Conservancy’s professional development series.

    Read the complete report | Click Here (pdf)

  • Promoting Stewardship and Volunteer Monitoring in the Elizabeth River/Arthur Kill Watershed through Hands-on Experiences
    Kean University, in partnership with Future City, Inc, a nonprofit organization in Elizabeth, promoted stewardship of the Elizabeth River / Arthur Kill Watershed through an intensive educational campaign and hands-on experiences. This project included creating multi-lingual posters, planning a watershed day at Kean University, and identifying and training a diverse cohort of volunteers to establish a long term water quality monitoring effort using a variety of tools and technologies. The project empowered individuals from local schools and communities to have a positive impact on water quality in the Elizabeth River, Arthur Kill and the Harbor Estuary ecosystem.

    Read the complete report | Click Here (pdf)

  • All Hands on Deck: A NY/NJ Harbor Education Program
    The New Jersey Marine Sciences Consortium (NJMSC) conducted harbor education programs for K-12 students under its newest education initiative, All Hands On Deck (AHOD). AHOD serves schools in New York and New Jersey located near Port sites and is conducted aboard commuter ferries by NJMSC and their AHOD partners, including the New Jersey Department of Transportation Office of Maritime Resources. The student field trips feature hands-on participation in harbor-based learning activities selected to develop a better understanding and appreciation of both the natural and commercial aspects of the Port of NY/NJ and the Harbor Estuary Complex.

    Read the complete report | Click Here (pdf)

  • Estuaries and Watersheds
    Beczak Environmental Education Center conducted 15 two-hour “Estuaries and Watersheds” educational enrichment programs for elementary and middle school children primarily from Yonkers, NY. The programs introduced students to the estuary using Beczak’s 5-foot by 2.5 foot Hudson River Watershed Model, a replica of the estuary from Newburgh-Beacon Bridge to the Lower New York Bay. The educational experience was further enhanced with a second estuary-related program selected by the classroom teacher. The curriculum was designed to convey an understanding of the interdependence and fragility of this complex ecosystem and how it has been influenced by human actions.

    Read the complete report | Click Here (pdf)

  • Green Leaders: An Environmental Stewardship Program at Brooklyn Bridge Park
    Green Leaders: An Environmental Stewardship Program at Brooklyn Bridge Park
    The Brooklyn Bridge Park Conservancy educated Park visitors through a new stewardship program called “Green Leaders.” Although portions of Brooklyn Bridge Park have yet to be built, it will ultimately encompass 1.3 miles of waterfront Atlantic Avenue and the Manhattan Bridge in Brooklyn. Green Leaders bring community volunteers into the direct practice of caring for the ecological health of the Park through education and hands-on stewardship activities like planting native species and protecting trees. A special training program helped create team leaders for future projects and events, and included study of the estuary, upland and shoreline habitat, and the means to their protection.

    Read the complete report (including pictures) | Click Here (pdf)

  • Go-Fish the East River
    Go-Fish the East River
    East River CREW (Community Recreation and Education on the Water) presented six Sunday afternoon “Go-Fish” festivals at East 96th Street and the Esplanade during the summer. Bait, fishing rods, traps, and aquariums were provided during these bilingual, family-oriented catch and release fishing and trapping events. Interactive science, geography and art activities for young people were also offered. By moving beyond the water’s edge and learning about the fish living there, community members of all ages were able to connect with the Harbor Estuary. Participants learned how to become stewards of their local waters and had the opportunity to make a pledge to protect the estuary.

    Read the complete report | Click Here (pdf)

  • Urban Waters Environmental Education Program 2004
    The Urban Waters Environmental Education Program took place aboard the South Street Seaport Museum’s (SSSM) schooner Lettie G. Howard. This overnight sail training and marine education program served 39 at-risk teens from New York City social service organizations. Participants explored New York City’s waterways, conducted hands-on marine and environmental science activities and experiments, and discussed the fundamental connection between the health of the estuary and the metropolitan region’s large urban population. The South Street Seaport Museum designed the program to help young New Yorkers develop an enhanced sense of stewardship for the waters of the Harbor Estuary.

  • From Sea to Seining Sea: Using Language Arts and Science to Improve Stewardship of the Estuaries in K-12 New York City School Children
    From Sea to Seining Sea ...
    Biology and education professors at St. Francis College in Brooklyn Heights teamed up to offer a two-day workshop about the Harbor Estuary to teachers-in-training enrolled in their language arts and science courses. Workshop sessions focused on historical and scientific information about the Harbor Estuary, hands-on water quality analysis with computers, and practical advice for taking K-12 students on field trips. The teachers sailed the waters of the harbor, visited a salt marsh restoration site and developed lessons and hands-on activities to use with their future students. This project gave new teachers the confidence and experience they need to teach about the estuary both in the classroom and in the field.

    Read the complete report | Click Here (pdf)

  • Seaside Nature Park’s Shoreline Restoration
    Turnaround Friends, Inc. (TFI) ) expanded its project to restore the Seaside Nature Park, a Harbor & Estuary Program Priority Habitat Site in Staten Island. The goals of the project were to reestablish the function and benefits of this coastal property and ensure the future protection of the Park’s valuable natural resources. TFI’s ongoing program, in partnership with NYC Parks, removes debris and other contaminants to improve the ecosystem’s water quality, aesthetics, wildlife habitat and overall value to the community. This shorefront restoration project, along with TFI’s ongoing educational program, helped to spread the message that “we can and must rescue and restore our shoreline and wetlands areas.”

    Read the complete report (including pictures) | Click Here (pdf)

 

2003 Stewardship Grants back to top

  • High School Water Quality Education
    The Hackensack Riverkeeper, Inc. conducted water quality testing with six high schools in the lower half of the Hackensack River Watershed. The students and teachers were trained for test procedures, techniques, and safety prior to the commencement of sampling. Other topics discussed included watersheds, estuaries, point source and non-point source pollution, streambed composition, and aquatic and terrestrial animal life. This project provided a hands-on, field-based water quality experience for students and teachers.

  • Stream, Watershed, and Estuary Identification Project
    Stream, Watershed, and Estuary Identification Project
    The Monmouth County Planning Board marked bridges on county roads with signs that identify the stream that it crosses as well as the watershed and drainage basin in which it is located. These signs increase public awareness and concern for the waterways in the Metropolitan Region. They also distributed the “Stream Corridor Protection” Eco-Tips brochure that they published in 2001, which discusses non-point source pollution, preventing erosion, and establishing stream buffers.

  • Harbor Herons Citizen Monitoring Program
    The New York City Audubon Society has conducted a Harbor Herons Citizen Monitoring Program for the past 20 years. In this project, they conducted nest surveys with members of the New York City Audubon Society that were trained to become Harbor Herons Stewards. These surveys were conducted at various islands in the NY Harbor.

  • Sustaining The Arthur Kill/Elizabeth River Estuary Project
    Future City Inc. informed and educated the public of the Elizabeth River/Arthur Kill sub-watershed about the urban estuarine environment that they live in through multilingual Internet estuarine resources. Educating the residents and small businesses about how to practice good housekeeping and management practices to control non-point source pollution was also part of their project. A coalition of multilingual estuarine stewards is the goal of this project.

  • Estuaries and Watersheds
    The Beczak Environmental Education Center conducted thirty “Estuaries and Watersheds” educational enrichment programs in elementary and middle schools in low-income school districts in Yonkers. They taught these children about the ecology of the NY/NJ Harbor Estuary using the Hudson River Watershed Model and curriculum developed around this model. The curriculum covers habitat and living resources, nutrients and organic enrichment, toxics, floatable debris, and rainfall-induced discharges.

  • Urban Waters Environmental Education Program
    South Street Seaport Museum conducted three overnight programs on their schooner, the Lettie G. Howard, which accommodates thirteen students. The students are considered full-time crewmembers and are taught how to fight a fire, rescue a person that has fallen overboard, read a navigational chart, as well as identify the location and function of most of the lines on the boat. Students also conducted scientific activities to build an awareness and appreciation of the estuary. The activities ranged from conducting otter trawls to comparing marine habitats; collection and analysis of water samples; and discussion of effects of pollution on water quality, human intervention and commercial trade within the harbor and its effects on water quality and marine life.

  • Get Wet: A Web Based Teacher’s Resource for Bringing the Estuary into Classrooms
    The South Street Seaport Museum developed a teachers’ site within their website that included web-based lesson plans on estuarine science and stewardship. These lesson plans can be used in conjunction with a field trip on the South Street Seaport Museum’s schooner, the Pioneer, or can be used alone as a school-based mini unit on the estuary. The four topics covered with this grant are water chemistry, water quality, marine biological processes, and stewardship, but more topics will be added in the future using the template that will be created.

  • Newark Watershed Professional Development Program for Educators
    The Greater Newark Conservancy trained several Newark public school teachers on how to use the national curriculum, Wonders of Wetlands (WOW) and a NJ based curriculum, NJ Watershed Approach to Teaching the Ecology of Regional Systems (NJ WATERS). The training and the curriculum increased teacher’s awareness of local resources and aided them in leading their own field trips. WOW and NJ WATERS were discussed the first day of the workshop. On the second day of the workshop, a field trip was conducted through the Meadowlands to demonstrate water sampling, wildlife identification, and hands-on science experiments. Teachers at the workshop received the curriculum for WOW and NJ WATERS, a virtual field trip CD, maps, and a watershed study kit.

  • Restoration of Flat Creek Subwatershed
    The Bayshore Sub-watershed Regional Council addressed non-point source pollution in the Flat Creek sub-watershed. Flat Creek flows through Holmdel Township, Hazlet Township, and Union Beach Borough. There is a NJDEP Ambient Biomonitoring Network station on Flat Creek, and it revealed in 1994 that the benthic macroinvertebrate population is severely impaired causing Flat Creek to be placed on the NJ’s 303(d) list. Erosion and sedimentation due to urbanization, development, and construction have been suggested as being the cause. The Bayshore Sub-watershed Regional Council conducted storm drain marking in this sub-watershed and created a brochure for local residents and businesses about non-point source pollution and stormwater management. The project also involved monitoring for total suspended solids at selected locations,  a stream cleanup, and presentations to various groups on this topic.

  • Beacon-Foxfire Project
    The Hudson River Sloop Clearwater conducted classroom programs and boat based field trips for elementary and high school students from underserved communities in Yonkers and New York City to increase estuary awareness. The project included classroom discussions about the estuary before the field trip. On the boat the students helped in raising the sails, navigating the boat, and setting and hauling in a fishing net. Other on-board-activities included learning stations to introduce the students to examine and study the days catch; perform water chemistry tests; and study plankton and invertebrates under microscopes or magnifiers. Teachers received classroom materials complementing the field trip.

  • Jamaica Bay Clean Sweep: Removal of Abandoned Boats and Debris
    The American Littoral Society and Jamaica Bay Ecowatchers worked together to remove abandoned boats and other large items of debris from the shorelines of Jamaica Bay. Removing these items facilitates restoration of habitat; prevents toxics from polluting the bay; removes hazards to navigation; increases public participation and awareness; and decreases sites of stagnant water where mosquitoes can breed.

 

2002 Stewardship Grants back to top

  • Act for Estuaries
    Alley Pond Environmental Center (APEC) worked with local middle school teachers, students, and their families to increase public awareness and motivate people to actively participate in the estuary's protection and restoration. The project involved the compilation of an APEC teacher's guide to salt marshes and estuaries (to be given to 150 teachers), a workshop for 10 teachers, class visits for their students, and two presentations for parents of these students. The teacher's guide defines and explains the characteristics, features, and function of estuaries, as well as the environmental issues that threaten them. The teacher training workshop introduced in-class and outdoor hands-on activities for teaching students about the estuary ecosystem and associated topics. Teachers brought their students to APEC for a 2 ½ hour workshop examining the flora and fauna found in this ecosystem, their habitats, relationships, and interdependence on each other and the physical environment. Parents and students were also encouraged to participate in two environmental service projects sponsored by this grant.

  • Storm Drain Marking of Weequahic Lake Drainage Area
    The Metropolitan Watershed Outreach and Education Committee conducted a Weequahic Lake Drainage Area Storm Drain Marking project. Although the lake is physically located in Newark, storm drains from Hillside, Elizabeth, and Newark all empty into it. The lake itself drains into Newark's Peripheral Ditch (formerly known as First River), which in turn discharges to Newark Bay, and hence the NY-NJ Harbor Estuary. 6th grade studentsfrom each of the three towns that impact the Lake, placed curb markers to identify the storm drains near their schools that empty into Weequahic Lake. Later in the day, the students participated in an event in Weequahic Park, symbolically representing the water that flows into the lake. This event emphasized to students and local officials the detrimental effects of non point source pollution and stress that storm drains, waterways and municipalities are all interconnected.

  • Hackensack Riverscaping to Reduce NPS
    Stormwater runoff from non point sources (NPS) is a major contributor to water pollution in the Hackensack River watershed and the NY/NJ Harbor Estuary Complex. This NPS pollution is coming from innumerable sources, including the homes and yards of watershed residents. Hackensack Riverkeeper, Inc. (HRI) produced and distributed "Hackensack Riverscaping" booklets. These booklets provide citizens with educational materials tailored to their watershed and increase their ability to be good river stewards who intelligently protect and enhance the watershed. The booklets also list HRI’s Watershed Watch hotline number and a tear-off section for volunteering and signing up for programs. HRI distributed the booklets through their programs, mailing list and special presentations, conferences, and other events. Throughout the life of the project, HRI promoted the booklet and a "you can make a difference" attitude toward watershed health through their extensive media contacts, as well as through direct presentations to citizens.

  • Bowman’s Creek Restoration
    Mariners Marsh Conservancy, Inc. (MMC) removed debris from the stream that connects Mariners Marsh to the Kill Van Kull, known both as Bowman's Creek and Newton's Creek, and the surrounding area. This allowed the stream to be flushed by the waters of the Kill Van Kull as the tides rise and permitted fresh water from the creek to flow freely into the Kill. MMC organized two volunteer clean-ups to locate and gather debris, hired machinery and a dumpster to facilitate removal of the debris from the park.

  • Exploring Raritan Shores
    The New Jersey Audubon Society (NJAS) provided citizens of the Raritan Bay Shore with a series of family oriented environmental education seminars to address the ecological importance of stream corridors, salt marshes, tidal wetlands and natural beachfront. The outdoor seminars took place at sites identified by the Raritan Bay Wildlife Habitat Report, produced by NJAS after a three-year wildlife and habitat inventory. Three of these sites are also on the HEP Priority Acquisition and Restoration Site list. An experienced NJAS teacher-naturalist led the trips with help from partnering organizations. By visiting one or more of the remaining natural areas along the bay, the participants experienced functioning natural systems and were able to understand the important role they play in maintaining a healthy harbor estuary.

  • NY-NJ Harbor Estuary Workshops with WET and WOW!
    The New Jersey Project WET Program sponsored eight workshops for teachers of grades 3-10 in New Jersey’s Harbor Estuary Region. The program established a committee of interested partners to integrate accurate and interesting information about the Harbor Estuary into select lessons from the award-winning Project WET (Water Education for Teachers) and WOW! (Wonders of Wetlands!) curricula. Trained facilitators guided the workshop participants through several hands-on, interdisciplinary lessons, which they could then use to educate their students about the estuary’s importance and cultural, natural and economic value.

  • “Down to the Hudson: The Sparkill Creek” Exhibit
    The Orangetown Historical Museum & Archives created a set of 4 maps demonstrating the history of the Sparkill Creek and adjacent land use for its exhibition, "Down to the Hudson: The Sparkill Creek." The maps were used in the 1st part of this exhibit to depict land use during four time periods: Native American and colonial farming periods, the 19th century industrial revolution, 20th century suburbanization, and present-day residential and commercial use. The 2nd part of the exhibit used photographs and text to show how the creek serves the community recreationally, as a wildlife sanctuary, and most importantly as a protective watershed. The 3rd and last part of the exhibit described current efforts to solve the creek's problems, initiated both by government at all levels, and by private civic groups. The exhibition was also adapted to an 8-panel traveling exhibit to visit local high schools, libraries and civic buildings free of charge as part of the museum's outreach program.

  • Outreach for 2002 River Project Events
    The River Project (TRP) at Pier 26 in Manhattan hosted a series of free, educational events for the public including open houses with outdoor science activities and demonstrations, seminars, conferences, lectures, and barbecues. These events were linked to ongoing research at the TRP field station and educational programs such as marine biology internships for high school students. The events called the attention of city dwellers to the natural resources in their backyard, the function of science in the estuary, and the importance of stewardship and conservation. In past years, outreach for these events consisted only of postcard mailings. This grant also allowed publishing promotional materials, and organizing volunteers to distribute these materials to attract new audiences, especially residents and workers in the surrounding neighborhoods.

  • Kids Island Club (KIC) Nature Program: Spring 2002
    Randall’s Island Sports Foundation (RISF) offered its Kids Island Club (KIC) Nature program to three Washington Heights/Inwood and Harlem Middle School classes. The program was planned and run by RISF's KIC Coordinator, the public school science teachers, and Bank Street College of Tiorati Workshop of Environmental Learning consultants. This group met with an ecologist and marine biologist from the NYC DPR Natural Resources Group to explore techniques for conducting water, soil and marine life sampling at the Inlet. The group then taught these techniques to the KIC Nature students and incorporated the program into the class curriculum. Each class made several trips to the Island’s Hell Gate Inlet to conduct an inventory of marine and bird life and study water tides, water composition and other relevant environmental conditions. After an exploration of the site, the students worked in small groups to study specific organisms or other topics of their choice, conduct and document experiments and pursue their research in class. Students developed their work into research papers and presented these to the class.

  • Beach Ecology and Care of Habitats (BEACH)
    The Wildlife Conservation Society NY Aquarium offered Beach Ecology and Care of Habitats (BEACH) to five elementary classes in Brooklyn District 21. Project BEACH is an innovative marine science educational program whose primary objectives are to teach coastal ecology, encourage stewardship of the shore and promote community awareness. Each class participated in the project’s three components: 1) a Beach Ecology and Collecting Techniques class will combine class work with hands-on exploration of the sandy shore, to emphasize adaptations and techniques of specimen collecting, 2) an Invertebrate Design class allows participants to utilize cooperative learning, dissection, animal handling and microscopes to explore five phyla of marine invertebrates, and 3) a Marsh Trip teaches students about salt marsh ecology and conservation issues at Gerritsen Creek through discussions with field biologists and "Marsh Metaphors," a game highlighting the various benefits that marshes offer. In addition, students observed and collected data on the growth of oysters housed at the aquarium. Throughout the course of the project, students maintained personal journals to record their feelings, observations and experiences.

  • Passaic River Restoration Project II
    The Passaic River Coalition (PRC) facilitated a collaborative planning program with local governments to promote the continued creation of a greenway corridor of open space and public access, and to develop educational and informational materials to convey the objectives. A committee of citizens and local government representatives from the lower valley of the Passaic River examined the successes of the original Passaic River Restoration Project (PRRP) and developed an updated plan of action with new objectives. The PRRP II is a GIS-based study assessing past initiatives and identifying new opportunities to preserve open space, develop parkland, increase access to the river and promote efforts to improve the health of the Passaic River. This project produced a Passaic River greenway plan and a full color map of the region identifying existing open space and proposed projects of the new plan. These materials will help the region’s local governments develop the education and public relations component of the project.




2] Habitat Restoration Grants › back to top


2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006


2013 Habitat Restoration Grants back to top

HEP, in partnership with NEIWPCC, is funding several habitat projects this year. As projects are completed, final reports will be posted. 

  • A Standard Protocol for Assessing the Habitat Quality of Ecologically Enhanced
    Urban Shoreline: 2013-2014

    A team led by Columbia University, in partnership with researchers from  Stony Brook University, the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, and the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies will be collaborating with the NY-NJ Harbor & Estuary Program’s Urban Shorelines Advisory Committee to develop and pilot a standard protocol to assess the habitat quality associated with ecologically enhanced shoreline stabilization techniques in the urban NY-NJ Harbor Estuary. This protocol will complement other work being conducted in the harbor and elsewhere on shoreline habitat, and goals for increasing shoreline and shallow habitat in the Hudson-Raritan Estuary Comprehensive Restoration Plan. A standard protocol will allow stakeholders to build a library of case studies so that regulators, managers, landowners, and engineers can make better decisions for our urban shoreline habitat.

    A Standard Protocol for Assessing the Habitat Quality of Ecologically Enhanced Urban Shoreline: 2013-2014Examples of ecologically-enhanced urban shorelines (Hudson-Raritan Estuary Comprehensive Restoration Plan).

    Read: Literature review of the effects of stabilization on the habitat value of shorelines in highly urbanized estuaries | Click Here (pdf)

    Read: Initial methods for developing and piloting the assessment protocol | Click Here (pdf)


  • Sunset Cove Park Soil Survey and Topographic Survey

    Sunset Cove Park Soil Survey and Topographic Survey
    “Sunset Cove Park is a 9.37 acre undeveloped site on a Jamaica Bay inlet (near Big Egg Marsh, part of Gateway National Recreation Area). Formerly an illegal dumping site, the area was seized in 2009 by New York City Department of Parks and Recreation, and is an opportunity for wetlands restoration and public access. As the site is a priority for restoration due to its large size and potential for both public access and wetlands restoration, HEP Habitat funds are being used to conduct a preliminary site analysis as a first step toward future restoration. HEP will be working with Langan Engineering & Environmental Services and Mercator Land Surveying, LLC to conduct a site soil survey and topographic survey.


2012 Habitat Restoration Grants back to top

HEP, in partnership with NEIWPCC, is funding several habitat projects this year. As projects are completed, final reports will be posted. 

  • Finalization of Phase I of the Oyster Restoration Research Project

    Finalization of Phase I of the Oyster Restoration Research Project

    The Hudson River Foundation worked with New York-New Jersey Baykeeper to finalize the first experimental phase of the Oyster Restoration Research Project. In 2009, a partnership of more than 30 foundations, not-for-profits, and state and city agencies formed for the purpose of creating and conducting research at a series of oyster reef research sites in the Hudson Raritan Estuary. In 2010, partners built six experimental oyster reefs at locations geographically distributed throughout the. NY-NJ HEP contributed $80,000 to the finalization of this research project, supporting a final year of monitoring of the oyster reefs, oyster aquaculture, and experimental methods to reduce transport of “spat on shell” (baby oysters).

    Read the complete report | Click Here (pdf)

    For more information about oysters, the partnership, and the final technical report, Click Here.

2011 Habitat Restoration Grants back to top

HEP, in partnership with NEIWPCC, is funding several habitat projects this year. As projects are completed, final reports will be posted. 

  • Tributary Connections - Investigating the possibility of fish passage in the Lawrence Book

    Tributary Connections - Investigating the possibility of fish passage in the Lawrence Book
    The Lawrence Brook Watershed Partnership
    will be looking at the possibility of improving fish passage over two obstructions on the Lawrence Brook, a tributary to the Raritan River (see map below). The group will conduct an initial analysis of the possibilities for fish passage, as well as a fishery survey, safe yield analysis, and habitat suitability analysis over the first two blockages on the river: Westons Mill Pond Dam and Westons Arch Dam (.12 miles apart).The installation of fish passage over these dams would provide an additional three miles of open, unobstructed habitat. If passage were provided on the other blockages upstream, an additional nine miles could be added in the future (12 in total). These dams are owned by the City of New Brunswick and sill function as drinking water supply reservoirs. Removal was therefore not considered to be an option in this case.

    Read the complete report | Click Here (pdf)
  • Pralls Island Heron Rookery Restoration and Harbor Herons Studies (Islands for Waterbirds)

    Tributary Connections - Investigating the possibility of fish passage in the Lawrence Book
    New York City and New Jersey Audubon and New York City Parks will be launching a pilot project to restore, monitor, and manage roosting and nesting habitat on Prall's Island off of Staten Island, in the Arthur Kill. The island historically housed waterbird nests, but due to a combination of habitat loss and other factors, there has been little to no nesting activity at the location in recent years. Audubon and NYC Parks will remove invasive species and restore native habitat at the site, and begin a monitoring protocol to track the success of planting efforts as well as potential future waterbird use. This will include the monitoring of birds at nearby nesting and foraging habitat (presence and productivity), including a wing-tagging study to increase the understanding of waterbird movement between nearby habitats, as well as the monitoring of predator presence. This pilot will provide a critical case study for future restoration efforts throughout the estuary.

    Read: Pralls Island Heron Rookery Restoration, NYC Parks Habitat Restoration report | Click Here (pdf)
    Read: Pralls Island Heron Rookery Restoration, NYC Audubon Habitat Monitoring Technical Report | Click Here (pdf)

2010 Habitat Restoration Grants back to top

HEP, in partnership with NEIWPCC, is funding two habitat projects this year. As projects are completed, final reports will be posted. 

  • Tributary Connections - Fish to Move Upstream in the Bronx River
    Tributary Connections - Fish to Move Upstream in the Bronx River
    New York City Department of Parks and Recreation will create final designs for fish passages at the Bronx Zoo Dam and the Snuff Mill Dam on the Bronx River. The group will also work to ensure funding for the construction of the project. These passages will allow fish such as river herring to move upstream, enjoying an additional 7.3 miles of habitat that was previously blocked by the dams. Key partners for the project include the Wildlife Conservation Society and the New York Botanic Garden

  • Oyster Reefs in the City! 
    Oyster Reefs in the City!
    New York-New Jersey Baykeeper will be maintaining, monitoring, and improving the five previously installed oyster reefs of the Oyster Restoration Research Partnership. These reefs, placed in fall 2010, mimic natural reefs and are an experimental effort to determine how well oysters will survive in different parts of the harbor (Hastings-on-Hudson, Soundview Park, Governor’s Island, Bay Ridge Flats, and Staten Island). This project is a feasibility study for the longer-term goal of increasing oyster habitat and improving water quality in the harbor. In addition to monitoring oyster health and water quality, Baykeeper will be working with the Urban Assembly New York Harbor School to breed and raise local oyster strains.

    Read the complete report | Click Here (pdf)


2008 Habitat Restoration Grants back to top

  • Integrating Habitat Restoration into the Daylighting Project for the Saw Mill River in Downtown Yonkers
    Integrating Habitat Restoration into the Daylighting Project for the Saw Mill River in Downtown Yonkers
    The Saw Mill River Daylighting is a project of the City of Yonkers to unearth 800 feet of the river (which is currently channelized and running underground) near its confluence with the Hudson River, the first project of its kind in the Northeast. With HEP funding, Groundwork Hudson Valley evaluated different habitat restoration options, obtained and incorporated feedback from local residents, environmentalists and other stakeholders, and worked to incorporate habitat restoration and environmental benefits to the daylighting project. After studying the possibilities and constraints, the final daylighting design includes: elimination of barriers and provision of structures benefiting fish passage, establishment of freshwater submerged aquatic vegetation, an attempt to introduce alewife spawning runs, and planting of freshwater marsh vegetation along the embankments of the daylighted river.

    Read the complete report | Click Here (pdf)


2007 Habitat Restoration Grants
back to top

  • Rahway River Fish Ladder Conceptual Restoration Plan
    Rahway River Fish Ladder Conceptual Restoration Plan
    Building on work previously funded by HEP, Weston Solutions, Inc. conducted additional work to further evaluate the feasibility of two possible designs for a fish passage for the water supply dam in the lower reaches of the Rahway River in New Jersey. Specific factors studied by the group included: 1) the presence and location of buried underground utilities within the path of the proposed fish ladder, 2) conduct a fish survey on both sides of the dam to confirm the presence of species that may potentially use the fish passage, 3) survey the presence of suitable spawning areas upstream of the dam and determine if habitat enhancements is needed or appropriate, and 4) conduct an archeological and historical assessment of the project area. Based on this information, Weston Solutions will prepare a Feasibility Report that could then be used to plan and construct the fish passage.

    Read the complete report (including pictures and site plans) | Click Here (pdf)

  • Idlewild Park Wetlands Restoration
    Idlewild Park Wetlands Restoration
    The Eastern Queens Alliance, Inc (EQA) will completed design drawings and developed and administered construction documents for a wetland restoration project within Idlewild Park on Jamaica Bay. Approximately $340,000 of environmental benefit funds have been set aside for this project by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) for restoration, protection, and increased public access to this site.

    Read the complete report (including site plans) | Click Here (pdf)


2006 Habitat Restoration Grants
back to top

  • Fish ladder at Rahway Water Supply Dam
    Fish ladder at Rahway Water Supply Dam
    Weston Solutions, Inc. conducted a preliminary feasibility evaluation for the construction of a fish passage for the Rahway River Water Supply Dam, which provides water for the city of Rahway. This is the most downstream obstruction on the Rahway River and it is located near two HEP habitat restoration sites, immediately south of the Union County Rahway River Park. A fish passage would allow migrating fish (including alewife, blueback herring, gizzard shad, white perch, and American eel) to reach their native spawning grounds upstream from the dam while preserving the dam’s functionality. The study concluded that two types of fish passages (steep-pass and bypass ramp) were potentially suitable for this location. Before preparing a conceptual plan for the project, additional studies will be needed to select the best alternative for the site and rule out any impediments to the construction of the fish passage.

    Read the complete report (including pictures and site plans) | Click Here (pdf)




3] Public Acces Grants › back to top

2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007


2013 Public Access Grants back to top

  • City of Water Day Festival
    City of Water Day Festival

    The Metropolitan Waterfront Alliance (MWA) carried its sixth annual City of Water Day Festival. HEP funding supported the event at its many satellite locations throughout the harbor and provided grants for groups attending the event, for estuary-related displays and to help defray transportation costs.

    Read the complete report (including pictures) | Click Here

2012 Public Access Grants back to top

  • Case Studies in Sea Level Rise Planning

    Due to a combination of climate change and regional subsidence, sea level in New York and New Jersey is rising faster than the global average. Though there is uncertainty as to the exact degree of rise expected, the New York Panel on Climate Change projects an increase of between 1-2 feet by the 2080s using a central range of scenarios, or 2.5-4.5 feet using rapid ice melt scenarios. This increase in sea level puts pressure on coastal resources across the globe. Here in the most urban estuary in the nation, there is a delicate balance between a diverse array of human uses and riparian habitats. In particular, water-based recreational areas, from which we reap the benefits of tourism, recreation, and an improved quality of life, are at the forefront of these changes. There is a precedent for valuable large-scale sea level rise planning efforts locally such as New Jersey’s Coastal Coastal Community Vulnerability Assessment Protocol, New York City’s PlaNYC, and the upper Hudson’sRevitalizing Hudson Riverfronts.  However, there are few examples of recommendations for adaptation at the fine- or site-scale.  For this reason, HEP launched a Climate-Ready Estuaries project to look at projected sea level rise and evaluating site-specific vulnerability at three publicly accessible recreation areas long the Raritan River: Donaldson Park, in Highland Park New Jersey, Old Bridge Park in Laurence Harbor, NJ, and Woodbridge Waterfront Park, a to-be-developed waterfront park in Woodbridge, NJ. Read more ...

  • City of Water Day Festival
    City of Water Day Festival

    The Metropolitan Waterfront Alliance (MWA) carried out its fifth annual City of Water Day Festival, a day-long event bringing estuary residents to enjoy the waters around us. It is estimated that over 30,000 people attended on July 14th, 2012. This year’s event was held on Governors Island, Liberty State Park, and at fifteen “In Your Neighborhood” sites throughout the harbor.

    Read the complete report (including pictures) | Click Here




2011 Public Access Grants
back to top


HEP, in partnership with NEIWPCC, is funding four public access projects this year. As projects are completed, final reports will be posted.

  • River Barge Park Day
    River Barge Park Day

    The New Jersey Meadowlands Commission (NJMC) and its partner, the Bergen County Audubon Society hosted River Barge Park Day on May 19, 2012, a day-long event to celebrate the opening of NJMC’s new River Barge Park and Marina in Carlstadt, NJ, on the banks of the Hackensack River. Event activities to heighten public awareness of the Estuary as a vital natural resource included free pontoon boat and canoe rides, catch-and-release fishing, children’s activities, and talks and literature for all ages on the critical importance of the Estuary and its preservation. Bird watching opportunities further enhanced enjoyment and appreciation of the Estuary and its support of a unique urban ecosystem.

    Read the complete report | Click Here (pdf)

  • Back to the River Boat Tours & Walkshops
    Back to the River Boat Tours & Walkshops
    Ironbound Community Corporation in partnership with the City of Newark conducted a series of narrated boat tours and walkshops to bring over one thousand Newarkers to the Passaic River and its environs. The tours took place along Newark’s Passaic Riverfront, passing through the city’s Ironbound, Lower Broadway, and North Broadway neighborhoods and downtown.

    Read the complete report (including pictures) | Click Here



  • Free Public Kayaking at Kennedy Marina
    Free Public Kayaking at Kennedy Marina

    HEP funding allowed Yonkers Paddling and Rowing Club, Inc. (YPRC) to purchase two of their new kayaks and a cargo container to expand its existing public kayaking program at JFK Marina. The improvements achieved through this project allowed offering the free kayaking program to a larger audience, including more skilled boaters, and provided a chance to paddle across the Hudson River.

    Read the complete report | Click Here (pdf)


  • Access your Estuary!
    Access your Estuary!

    East River Community Recreation and Education on the Water (C.R.E.W.) maintained and expanded its community rowing access point off of the East River esplanade at East 96th Street. HEP funds allowed updating the portable rope (Bosun) ladders, prepare, test, and install a metal ladder for easier and safe access to the water and out of the water, and create a gate in the railing. These improvements enabled many more people to join the weekly public rowing program, more than doubling participation.

    Read the complete report | Click Here (pdf)


  • Hutchinson River Canoe/Kayak Launch Site Study
    Hutchinson River Canoe/Kayak Launch Site Study

    The Hutchinson River Restoration Project launched a study of opportunities for a potential kayak and canoe launching site on the Hutchinson River. This river currently lacks launching sites despite having a large local population and impressive natural resources, such as the salt marshes of Pelham Bay Park. The project involved an initial evaluation of eleven sites as potential new launch areas. HRRPworked with the surrounding communities to obtain feedback on the sites selected as well as potential designs. These options were presented to residents and interested stakeholders including the New York City Dept. of Parks and Recreation, residents of Co-op City, and New York City Department of Planning. This project brings the Hutchinson River one step further toward access to and from the water.

    Read the final report [Click Here (pdf)] and site launch survey [Click Here (pdf)]


2010 Public Access Grants back to top

  • City of Water Day Festival
    City of Water Day Festival
    The Metropolitan Waterfront Alliance (MWA) carried out its third annual City of Water Day Festival, a free day-long celebration of the waters that surrounds us and brings us together. This event drew 12,000 people from throughout the NY-NJ metropolitan region to participate in hundreds of unique, fun, and educational waterfront activities. City of Water was held at 5 locations throughout the Harbor Estuary: Governors Island, Liberty State Park, Brooklyn Bridge Park, Atlantic Basin, and Staten Island.

    Read the complete report (including pictures) | Click Here (pdf)

  • Open Water Swimming Races
    Open Water Swimming Races
    The Coney Island Brighton Beach Open Water Swimmers (CIBBOWS) held its Sixth Annual Grimaldo’s Mile (on June 27, 2010) and the Second Annual Aquarium 1M and Coney Island 5K Open Water Swimming Race (on August 07, 2010) at Coney Island and Brighton Beach, Brooklyn, NY. Over 130 people participated in these events and had a chance to learn about the Estuary.

    Read the complete report (including pictures) | Click Here (pdf)

  • All Club Invitational
    All Club Invitational
    Sebago Canoe Club held its first All Club Invitational event on July 17, 2010, which attracted over 150 human-powered boats to the waters of Jamaica Bay. Participants explored and learned about the Estuary and Jamaica Bay by participating in guided trips, and visiting informational tables at three landing sites throughout the Bay.

    Read the complete report (including pictures) | Click Here (pdf)

  • Harbor Discovery on Governors Island
    Harbor Discovery on Governors Island
    The Governor Island Alliance (GIA) hosted an educational program on the Island every weekend from June 5 to October 10, 2010. GIA conducted a variety of educational, recreational, and arts programming, including guided tours, signage, and our signature event, the Family Festival, and painted a giant-scale Harbor Map on a waterfront parking lot on Governors Island

    Read the complete report | Click Here (pdf)

  • Celebrate the Harlem River
    Celebrate the Harlem River
    The Urban Divers Estuary Conservancy will hold this family fun filled weekend event at Mill Pond Waterfront Park in the Bronx. The program will engage the public in hands-on activities in environmental literacy, maritime cultural enrichment and on-water excursions. It will feature the ENVIROMEDIA MOBILE with interactive exhibits and a variety of activities, including a presentation on birds of prey of the urban wetlands, a live underwater video exploration station of the river, a touch tank, guided Ecocruise, seining, and a coastal clean-up.

    Read the complete report | Click Here (pdf)

  • American Star December Youth Invitational Rowing Race
    American Star December Youth Invitational Rowing Race
    Floating the Apple held its Sixteenth Annual American Star December Youth Invitational Rowing Race in support of community team rowing, team building and community waterfront access on December 4th 2010 in Midtown Manhattan at the Hudson River Park & Estuarine Sanctuary at Pier 84 Floating the Apple Boat House, Dock and North Cove. The event was a success with 26 participating and twenty-one coaches present with over 130 youths/students.

    Read the complete report, including pictures | Click Here (pdf)

2009 Public Access Grants back to top

  • Fifth Annual Grimaldo’s Mile Open Water Swimming Race
    Fifth Annual Grimaldo’s Mile Open Water Swimming Race
    The Coney Island Brighton Beach Open Water Swimmers (CIBBOWS) held its Fifth Annual Grimaldo’s Mile Open Water Swimming Race from Coney Island to Brighton Beach, Brooklyn, NY on August 9, 2009. The event included United States Masters Swimming (USMS), Open and Wetsuit division. Close to 180 contestants participated in the race and approximately 150 spectators watched the event from the beach.

    Read the complete report (including pictures) | Click Here (pdf)

  • End-of Semester Community Boat Launch Celebration
    End-of Semester Community Boat Launch Celebration
    On June 12, 2010, Rocking the Boat held its End-of Semester Community Boat Launch Celebration at its headquarters in the South Bronx, adjacent to Hunts Point Riverside Park. The event brought together approximately 200 people from the community to celebrate the accomplishments of the youth who participated in Rocking the Boat’s boatbuilding and on-water education programs this past spring.

    Read the complete report (including pictures) | Click Here (pdf)

  • NY/NJ Baykeeper EcoCruises
    NY/NJ Baykeeper EcoCruises
    NY/NJ Baykeeper conducted three narrated, educational EcoCruises of the NY-NJ Harbor Estuary on August 9, 2009, July 11, 2010, and August 8, 2010, engaging almost 200 area residents.

    Read the complete report (including pictures) | Click Here (pdf)

  • Free Kayaking and Beach Cleanup
    Celebrate the Harlem River
    Red Hook boaters purchased a variety of equipment that allowed expanding their free kayaking and beach cleanup programs run from May through October.

    Read the complete report (including pictures) | Click Here (pdf)


2007 Public Access Grants back to top

  • Community-Based Public Access Programs
    Community-Based Public Access Programs
    HEP supported numerous community-based water activities and programs by local groups throughout 2007 and 2008. Funds were administered by the Metropolitan Waterfront Alliance. Read more about these projects in the Summer 2008 issue of The Tidal Exchange (pdf).








4] Other Projects › back to top

2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2002


2013 Other Projects back to top

  • HRECOS Continuous Monitoring Station 

    HEP supported the acquisition of appropriate continuous monitoring instrumentation by the Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission (PVSC) to initiate a new water quality monitoring station at their dock in the Passaic River in Newark, NJ. PVSC will maintain the station and ensure that data generated is appropriately incorporated into the Hudson River Environmental Conditions Observing System (HRECOS).


  • Impact Evaluation of Projected Dissolved Oxygen Deficits in the NY-NJ Harbor Estuary

    The Great Lakes Environmental Center will evaluate how dissolved oxygen levels affect organism abundance and diversity in the open waters of NY/NJ Harbor. The work will be an attempt to begin to understand how site-specific (ambient versus laboratory-derived), temporal and spatial

    circumstances can affect the presence, abundance and ability to thrive of marine organisms in areas of the Harbor which are not attaining the marine dissolved oxygen (DO) criteria, based primarily upon projected DO deficits. Read the scope of work for this project.

    Read the scope of work for this project | Click Here (pdf)


  • Clean Water: A Citizen Fish Advisory Effort

    Clean Water: A Citizen Fish Advisory Effort

    Future City, Inc. staff and interns worked closely with the NJ Department of Environmental Protection and the northern New Jersey AmeriCorps Watershed Ambassadors to enhance ongoing public education efforts targeted for residents of, and visitors to, the waterfront neighborhoods along the Newark Bay Complex and Arthur Kill Blueway through the cities of Elizabeth, Perth Amboy, Bayonne, and Seawaren, and Highland Park.

    Read the complete report (including pictures) | Click Here (pdf)

  • Hooked on Our Waters

    Hooked on Our Waters

    The New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) carried out a workshop on October 19, 2013 to disseminate information about fish advisories, explore and celebrate the ways we enjoy and interact with the natural resources surrounding us, and foster stewardship for these shared resources. For more information about the workshop, including presentations, visit the event page.


    2012 Other Projects
    back to top

    North Hudson Sewerage Authority facility in Hoboken, NJ
    The North Hudson Sewerage Authority facility in Hoboken, NJ, overlooking the Hudson River

    EPA's Climate Ready Water Utilities (CRWU) and Climate Ready Estuaries (CRE) initiatives are working to coordinate their efforts and support climate change risk assessment and adaptation planning.  Working with the New York-New Jersey Harbor & Estuary Program and the North Hudson Sewerage Authority, EPA facilitated an exercise using the Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool (CREAT) to help collaboratively identify climate change threats, assess potential consequences, and evaluation adaptation options at the utility and in the estuary. 

When a water treatment facility’s ability to process sewage is compromised, all adjacent receiving waters may be affected. As climate change is likely to increase overall sea level and the frequency of extreme rain and storm events, it is going to become increasingly challenging to achieve and maintain good water quality in the estuary. The CREAT tool provides a valuable exercise to help facilities identify vulnerabilities (e.g. in capacity or infrastructure) to handle future climate change, so that they may plan ahead by pinpointing ways to build resilience into their facility or operations for the future.

The report about this exercise documents the methodology used and the outcomes so that other water utilities and National Estuary Programs could conduct a similar exercise of their own.  The report can be found under the tools and resources tab of the CRWU page - or from this direct link.


2011 Other Projects
back to top

  • NY-NJ Harbor Estuary Paddling Guide
    NY-NJ Harbor Estuary Paddling Guide
    Going Coastal worked with HEP and partners to create a harbor estuary-wide map of public access sites, associated facilities, safety considerations, and launch site conditions. The water-resistant map can be viewed at Flickr, or you can request a hard copy by contacting us at habitat@harborestuary.org.

    Read the complete report | Click Here (pdf)

2010 Other Projects back to top

  • Horticulture Operations Center: Stormwater Retrofit
    The New York Botanical Garden will reconstruct the Horticulture Operations Center, reducing impermeable paved surfaces to increase on-site infiltration, and eliminating existing stormwater outflows to the Bronx River.

  • Waterfront Conference 2010
    Waterfront Conference 2010
    The Metropolitan Waterfront Alliance held its second Waterfront Conference themed on “The Future Waterfront & Funding for the NY-NJ Harbor” on November 30, 2010. This conference sponsored by HEP convened hundreds of stakeholders from New York and New Jersey and provided an opportunity for attendees to learn about the many ongoing initiatives to improve our waterfront and Estuary, including the Comprehensive Restoration Plan, New York City’s Comprehensive Waterfront Plan, and many others. For more about the Conference, click here.

  • Pumpout Stations Map
    Pumpout Stations Map
    Going Coastal has put together a map of pumpout locations (pdf) throughout the New York-New Jersey Harbor Estuary with funding from HEP and many other partners. This tool helps boaters to keep our waters clean. The New York waters of the Hudson River are an EPA designated No Discharge Area, where it is illegal to discharge any boat sewage from a holding tank or portable toilet or use a direct discharge toilet anywhere in the river, from the Battery to Troy Dam. All sewage must be emptied at a pumpout station. For an updated list of pumpout stations check Going Coastal's Web site.



2009 Other Projects back to top

  • "Discover the Hudson River" Activity Booklet
    "Discover the Hudson River" Activity Booklet
    HEP contributed funds for the development of a booklet, which provides information about the Hudson watershed through text, colors, games, maps and activities. To read more about the booklet or to request a copy click here.

  • Water Trail Guide
    Water Trail Guide
    Going Coastal put together a map of access points for human-powered boats. Download an electronic copy (pdf) or request a paper version (via our online request form, click here for your next adventure in the estuary.



2008 Other Projects back to top

  • Implementation and Assessment of the Effectiveness of the Green Infrastructure Technology in Newark, NJ
    ... Effectiveness of the Green Infrastructure Technology in Newark, NJ
    The Interstate Environmental Commission and eDesign Dynamics constructed and monitored a “green” stormwater management system in Newark, NJ, to reduce urban runoff through engineered infiltration, detention, reuse and evapotranspiration.

    Read the complete report (including pictures) | Click Here (pdf)

  • Stewards for Rain Gardens
    Stewards for Rain Gardens
    Future City, Inc in collaboration with the NJ Sea Grant Consortium (formerly NJ Marine Sciences Consortium) and Rutgers Cooperative Extension installed and maintained four rain gardens in Elizabeth and Newark, NJ. To read more about this project, check out the Summer 2009 issue of The Tidal Exchange (pdf).

  • Waterfront Conference 2008
    Waterfront Conference 2008
    The Metropolitan Waterfront Alliance (MWA) held the Waterfront Conference in November 2008 to launch the Waterfront Action Agenda. This Agenda is a comprehensive and practical plan to connect the people of the NY Metropolitan Area to an improved waterfront and was produced in collaboration with over 360 stakeholders, including HEP. The conference provided an opportunity to learn about issues affecting the waterfront and estuary and the many ongoing initiatives to address them, including the Comprehensive Restoration Plan. For more on the action agenda click here.







 

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